Our short Lyke Wake Walk crossing report for 21st July 2020!

I write for myself, and for my sons James and Ethan Moses, of Hutton le Hole. What a fantastic day we had of it! We arrived to a beautiful sunrise at Osmotherley and got quickly underway, leaving at 4.32am. The oldest member of the party – me, by a long, long way – knew this section of the walk from earlier crossings on the Coast to Coast and, of course, the Cleveland Way. No less stunning was it, though, on this morning of pearlescent light and distant views. We were interested to find a man camping with basha and bivy on Live Moor, and though we pitied him the somewhat cooling breeze it was becoming apparent that with that light movement of air to cool us our walk would be done in the very best of conditions. Indeed, we made great progress all the way, though a special mention must go to the Hamer moor – Roman Road in stage 4. Against our expectations it was all rather dry, and though there is some challenging ground to cover beyond The Blue Man I’ the Moss these drier conditions were not lost on us and very much appreciated. Perhaps because of this weather we saw a lot of wildlife. Just by The Blue Man I’ the Moss we saw the largest and most stunning and rather large adder (not our only encounter with one that day) which let us know in no uncertain terms that we should keep our distance – with a loud hiss. Beware! Best moments for Ethan: “the view from Carlton Hill, and singing together along the Iron Ore Railway.’ Best moments for James: ‘Carlton Hill, and that amazing earlier sunrise.’

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We were supported, and met for shorter breaks at checkpoints 2 (7.40am), 3 (got to Ralph Crosses around 10.50am), 4 (1pm), and something a little longer at Eller Beck. As we approached the end of the walk space appeared between us and having touched the Lyke Wake Stone (6.47pm) Ethan jogged back to his father to give ‘moral encouragement’ – a sign of the years between us! But from that final spot, on that night of warmth and clarity, we seemed to be able to see for ever! We could see with detail from where we had come, and looking seaward Beningborough Cliffs were highly lucid. Our actual walk time (verified using Walkmeter) was 13.08.

With best wishes
Dr David Moses
Hutton le Hole, 22nd July 2020

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